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ITC Talk By Roman

20 Sep, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Wat That Erawan Temple in Nong Bua Lamphu province – this is a cave temple inside a mountain called Pha Tham Chang. Tham Erawan is accessible via a winding staircase of 600 steps. There is a large Buddha statue at the cave’s entrance. The entrance leads to a huge hall decorated with various types of rock formations. A local folktale, Nang Phom Hom (The Lady with Fragrant Hair), is said to have taken place here.

 

 

-Phu Pa Por – a viewpoint in Loei province. From here you can enjoy a stunning view of the Phu Kradueng National Park and Thailand’s “Mount Fuji”. In order to get to the viewpoint, you need to hire a specially adapted tractor. It is fun to ride one!

 

-Chiang Khan – a small town on the Mekong River, facing Laos on the other side. The natural scenery and wooden houses create a special charming atmosphere. There are a night market and a number of small restaurants offering great local dishes and spectacular Mekong views.

 

-Phu Phra Bat Historical Park – located in the northwest corner of Udon Thani province this archeological site features a large number of ancient ruins and some amazing rock formations. The park combines a distinctively beautiful landscape with a trail of arts and religion stretching back over 3,000 years. The site was declared a historical park by the Fine Arts Department in 1991.

 

-Nong Khai – a town located on the Mekong River, just 20 km from Laos capital Vientiane. There is a border crossing into Laos and a bridge linking Thailand with the neighboring country. The high point of each week is the Saturday night market. Nong Khai is also known for an unusual festival, the Naga Fireballs Festival where glowing balls soar in the sky from the waters of the river. The phenomenon is observed at the end of Buddhist Lent (usually end of October).

 

-Wat Jetiyakhiri (Wat Phu Tok) in Bueang Kan province - Wat Phu Tok is one of Thailand’s true wonders. This giant sandstone outcrop, which can be seen from miles around, is accessed via a series of mainly wooden steps. It consists of seven levels, which represent the seven factors of Buddhist enlightenment. More than the temple itself, it is the whole system of bridges and wooden stairs going around Phu Tok mountain, which makes the visit interesting. And a little scary!

 

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